May. 4th, 2005

d_a_r_a: (Default)
I'm re-reading Stephen Mitchell's translation of the Tao Te Ching because it was only after I read it through the first time that I noticed the notes in the back. So I've been reading those in conjunction with the chapters they refer to. This notation was in reference to chapter 74 and is a story from the Huai Nan Tzu:

A poor farmer's horse ran off into the country of the barbarians. All of his neighbors offered their condolences, but his father said, "How do you know that this isn't good fortune?" After a few months the horse returned with a barbarian horse of excellent stock. All his neighbors offered their congratulations, but his father said, "How do you know that this isn't a disaster?" The two horses bred, and the family became rich in fine horses. The farmer's son spent much of his time riding them; one day he fell off and broke his hipbone. All his neighbors offered the farmer their condolences, but his father said, "How do you know that this isn't good fortune?" Another year passed, and the barbarians invaded the frontier. All the able-bodied young men were conscripted, and nine-tenths of them died in the war. Thus good fortune can be disaster and vice versa. Who can tell how events will be transformed?

x posted to [livejournal.com profile] _tao_te_ching

Laura

May. 4th, 2005 10:46 pm
d_a_r_a: (Default)
You have comments disabled on your first post - was this an accident or did you just not want us to be able to respond to you? Trying to have the last word are we?

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